The Lucky (and Unlucky) Foods for the New Year

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New Year traditions are full of superstition. And why not embrace some of those edible signs of things to come with some traditionally lucky…and unlucky…foods for New Year’s Day 2015.

Greens

Did you know that green veggies like collards, spinach and kale are usually eaten on New Year’s Day because they’re symbolic of wealth. Green leaves look like money, eaten as a symbolic gesture of bringing your family wealth in the upcoming year.

Also, if you’re preparing for a detox or new and improved diet plan in 2015, the greens are a great ingredient to add to the menu!

Noodles

In many Asian cultures, long noodles symbolize a long life. So, why not slurp down some ramen, soba or udon noodles to celebrate all the healthy happy years to come.  But make sure the noodles don’t break 😉

Grapes

Spanish and Mexican tradition is to eat 12 grapes at midnight – introducing the New Year. The grapes are not only believed to ward off evils for the next 12 months, they are also believed to predict the success of the year to come – sweeter grapes representing success and sour grapes predicting less-than-desirable months in the upcoming year.

Round Cakes

Round ring-shaped cakes represent completion of something that you want to come full circle.  It could be finishing a major project, resolving an issue that has been bothering you, or climbing the ladder to the next stage of your life. Whatever your goal may be, a round cake on New Years Day will symbolize its successful completion or a desired return to normalcy in 2015.

Lobster & Chicken

As a delicacy and a staple in American food culture, they’re both no-no’s for New Year’s Day. The lobster walks backward and the chicken scratches backward, symbolizing something in the upcoming year holding you back, introducing set-backs and preventing you from progressing in life.

 

Whether or not you believe in these superstitions, we hope everyone has a delicious and safe New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day! Cheers to 2015!

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