Foods That Sound Healthy, But Aren’t

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White rice

If eaten regularly, white rice can lead to a dramatic increase in blood sugar.  Studies show that it can increase your chance of developing diabetes.

A healthier alternative is brown rice.

Energy bars

Energy and protein bars  are just as unhealthy as any candy bar you might see in the check-out like at the grocery store; but, they also have a much higher price tag.

Why not try almonds and an apple if you’re looking for protein or an afternoon pick-me-up.

Swordfish

When you go out to a fancy restaurant and you’re in the mood for something exotic, steer clear of this bottom-feeding fish.  Swordfish tends to have some of the highest levels of mercury found in the fish we eat.

Some healthier alternatives may be salmon, cod or flounder.

Bottled tea and iced tea mixes

The reason these sweet drinks taste so good is because they’re packed with sugar. In some cases, more sugar than sodas.

Why not brew your own? This way you can control the amount of sugar you add. While there is a bit more effort involved here, it’s effort you can save in the gym.

Reduced-fat snacks

Yes, these options may have less fat listed on the nutrition label. However, when you take out one element, odds are that something else has been added. In many cases that ‘something’ is sugar.

Multi-grain bread

Be sure that the primary ingredient in that “whole wheat” bread is actually whole wheat. Otherwise, you are eating expensive white bread with some extra seeds on top.

Blueberry-flavored foods

9 times out of 10, the blueberries found in cereals and granola bars aren’t really blueberries. They are artificial, blueberry-flavored, who-knows-what that makes you think you’re actually eating fruit.

To be sure, buy fresh blueberries to add to your cereal, desserts and granola snacks.

 

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